Beauty Salon Marketing News

How Much Does Your Beauty Salon Business “Freebie”Cost?

How Much Does Your Beauty Salon Business “Freebie”Cost?

Everyone loves free, other than the people who must pay for it. This is the unsaid truth that exists behind any “free” marketing method or campaign. There is normally, though not always, a real cost in terms of time and money.

Salon CostSo when you’re tempted to offer something for free, be sure to count the cost in every way you need to, in order to make sure your free content, bonus gift or other promotional label you chose to give is affordable. It’s time for you to take a close look at the costs you’ll incur along the road to a freebie.

So what “free” promotions are we referring to?

The biggest places we see free work its way into our beauty salon businesses is with the act of gathering email addresses. Offering a freebie is standard operating procedure, and will not be changing anytime soon. In most cases we are offered a free ebook, report, video series, e-course, webinar or email series in return for our email address and other contact information.

What you must know is that there are costs associated with the creation of these freebies. Let’s take a look at several of the actual hard costs you’ll need to deal with in the creation of your freebies.

  • Creating the content – Someone must write, film, record whatever content you are producing. Unless that’s totally you, you’ll pay for this.
  • Designing the squeeze page or landing page – There are some great softwares out there, but they cost as well. And we know how much designers cost.
  • Production costs and shipping – If you need to manufacture a hard product, chances are you’ll have to pay to get it where it’s going.
  • Marketing funnel hard costs – Email autoresponders, setup costs for technical aspects, webinar charges. GoToWebinar for instance, charges at the bare minimum $99 a month for their lowest plan, which allows only 100 attendees. (to be fair, there are other lower-priced services)
  • Advertising – Are you going to be taking out ads for this freebie in order to attract the widest possible audience?

While it is still a smart idea to use this type of bribe to build a list of email subscribers, you should be aware of what your freebie really costs, and factor that into the cost per lead.

Which Social Media Metrics Should You Ignore?

measure-social-media-metrics1“Vanity metrics” is a term you may or may not have heard of. It refers to the standards by which we assess our traffic and online viability. What we are coming to realize is that several of these used to measure “results” can quite often be misleading and ought to be politely ignored.

Those you can safely ignore:

  • Likes, Followers and Connections – The one with the most followers wins, right? If only it were that easy. In reality, more followers translate to a better bottom line only if you are actively engaging with them, and building a relationship which leads to conversions. Merely having a massive number of likes or followers who don’t make the transition to customers is fairly pointless.
  • Comments – Since we are trying to increase conversion, our goal with content needs to be more than just creating posts (video, tweet, share) that generate a great number of comments, but no leads. Give them a reason to comment that leads them down the path toward conversion, for instance a leading question on the topic.
  • Impressions – Mainly used in your advertising, the number of ad impressions is relatively useless, as it does not indicate any measurable action. Simply having your ad display in front of a couple of million computer screens is no real measure of how it performs. Rather, examine click-thru rates and conversion rates.

More on this subject can be found at HubSpot.

Those you should keep an eye on:

  • Shares of your content – Even though this is not a concrete statistic, getting your content shared in whatever form is a step in the right direction. This indicates that your content making an impression (the right kind!) and is being shared around.
  • Social mentions and citations – Seeing that Google is now including social signals and citations into the search algorithm, this is an element that is very helpful. This aids your site in search, along with authority.
  • Conversions – The holy grail, so to speak. If all of your social media and content isn’t ultimately leading to conversions, you need to take a good look at it.

Read more about this at Mashable.

5 Costly Mistakes That Will Ding Your Online Beauty Salon Reputation

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Did You Know 85 Percent of Consumers Judge You by Your Online Reputation?

This sobering statistic form PC Retail shows that buyers do their homework online, and further that more than 70 percent will never even make an inquiry if your online reputation is dicey.

Reputation management has become a full-time cottage industry on the web, and for good reason. Word now travels at warp speed, and what used to go unnoticed is now being retweeted within minutes. Just ask any political candidate!

So how do you avoid getting damaged by this machine that has so much potential for both good and evil?

Rule 1: Avoid self-inflicted wounds!

There are far too many holes in the road as it is! Why create more yourself? Doing damage to your own reputation is by far the biggest favor you can do for your competition, as it makes their job so much simpler and yours, all the harder.

Here’s a brief list of unforced errors that can lead you directly to beauty salon business oblivion, with a corresponding lengthy road to recovery.

1. Not claiming your own beauty salon social profiles – This is one many people overlook. Oftentimes, unbeknownst to you, your beauty salon online reputation can be tarnished by others who claim your name on social media sites and post false or misleading information in your name. Make sure to claim your name on social media sites even if you don’t intend to use them, as it can head off a great deal of cleanup.

2. Retaliating against bad beauty salon reviews – Bad beauty salon reviews happen. When you engage in a mud-slinging contest it only exacerbates the situation. Instead, attempt to demonstrate what stellar customer service you have by going the extra mile to satisfy if possible, and if not, being as gracious and Gandhi-like as possible. You will gain points this way, and totally defuse the situation.

3. Lining yourself up with questionable beauty salon groups or individuals – If you are attempting to cultivate an online presence and reputation that caters to more than a tiny sliver, make sure not to declare your undying devotion to causes that, shall we say, border on the fringes. This can do you little good, and you would do well to steer clear of publicly airing your unpopular allegiances. Even if these are near and dear to your heart, consider your audience: will it be to them?

4. Committing embarrassing deeds or worse yet, crimes – Can you say Todd Akin? Anthony Weiner? You get the picture. Either run your beauty salon business or audition for that reality show. Hard to do both!

5. Tweeting, sharing and commenting using offensive language – I hesitate to include this as sometimes it possible to grab a lot of attention with a controversial statement or a well-placed expletive as “linkbait”. This has to be carefully considered however, and not part of an everyday approach. That gets old fast. Particularly avoid hate speech and hot button issues (politics) unless that’s your niche.

Managing your online reputation requires care. Don’t sabotage yourself! Grab your FREE Reputation report.